How to make the most out of your summer workout

 

Blonde woman in sportswear at fitness studio

It's summertime... Time for excessive sweat!

Do you love exercising but keep wondering why at certain times of the year it makes you feel fatigued? You may also be asking yourself why some places make you feel more comfortable than others. To make the most out of your summer workout, you can begin by understanding why this happens. Then, you can make some changes.

You'll find ways to:

  • Reduce fatigue.
  • Reduce the risk of muscle cramps, sunstroke, and heat exhaustion.
  • Feel fresh.
  • Breathe easier.
  • Prevent allergies and respiratory infections.

Ready? Let's begin!

Why do I sweat more during Summer Days?

During warm months, you get more visits from your friend Sweat: that's ok, don't feel ashamed. Love him because he's showing up for your own sake. But his company will be better when he makes short visits and rapidly evaporates. 

Do you know why he comes around? His job is to release your body's heat and to bring you back to your regular temperature. So he's got more work during summertime.

The second part of his job is to evaporate quickly. If he doesn't, it will be a failed mission. You won't be able to cool down. Like Sport Tracks says: "The wetness of sweat is not what makes you cool. Cooling happens when your sweat evaporates off of your skin."

Unfortunately,  he's found some enemies at work. The name of the biggest one is Humidity. When she's around she'll do everything she can to prevent Sweat from reaching the air. This will make temperature seem way higher than it really is. Why? Because Sweat won't be able to cool you down efficiently anymore.

Martial arts fight

The perceived temperature will vary depending on temperature and humidity levels. You can take a look at this table to understand:

Table 1- Apparent Temperature: Relative Humidity vs. Temperature

Danger Levels According to Apparent Temperature: Relative Humidity vs. Temperature

What happens if I exercise under these conditions? 

The World Climate Report states the dangers of certain temperatures and humidity levels:
  • CAUTION: Possible Fatigue with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity.
  • EXTREME CAUTION: Sunstroke, Heat Cramps and Heat Exhaustion possible with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity.
  • DANGER: Sunstroke, Heat Cramps and Heat Exhaustion likely with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity.
  • EXTREME DANGER: Heat/sunstroke likely with continued exposure.

So, you may wanna consider helping your friend Sweat beat Humidity.

What can I do if my workout is outdoors? 

You can't change the environmental conditions when you're exercising outdoors. But you can follow these recommendations from Mayo Clinic:

1. Stay out of the DANGER ZONE: Now that you've got this information, be on top of the weather forecast. You now know when you're putting yourself in DANGER. Did you know that hundreds of people die from exposure to heat and humidity every year? So, in times like these, don't even think about going outside. Exercise at home or in a fitness studio.
Danger Zone Sign
2. Wear sunscreen: Did you know that if you have a sunburn it will be more difficult for you to cool down?
3. Drink more fluids: Always drink water and fluids to prevent dehydration. This should be part of your daily routine. But, make sure you don't exceed! Drinking liquids in excess can mean losing some electrolytes along the way. It can also cause water retention.
Refreshing Natural Fruit Waters
4. Use special clothes: Nowadays, there are clothes with special technology for cooling you down. If you don't have any, at least try wearing very light clothes and avoid dark colors. If you prefer to go shopping to get a new fitness outfit, you have our permission.
5. Give your body some electrolytes: We lose electrolytes through excessive sweating. Some energy drinks will help you replace lost electrolytes. And there are some natural alternatives too! It's super important for you to keep your electrolyte levels in balance. 
6. Take it slow: First, get used to the temperature and do less-intensive exercises. Then, gradually increase the intensity of your workout. It can take around 2 weeks for your body to begin adapting.
Turtle Walking
7. Avoid drinking alcohol: Alcohol is a liquid, yes. But, we're sorry to tell you that it does the opposite to other drinks: it dehydrates you. So, this is definitely a "no-no".

    And if I exercise in a fitness studio or in my home gym, will the AC resolve my issues?

    If you exercise in a closed space, an AC may help you reduce temperature and some of the risks mentioned above. But you still need to watch out for relative indoor humidity. When its levels are above 55% it may affect your health and your quality of life too. (You can read about the 10 Reasons why Humidity may be Affecting your Quality of Life.)

    With high relative humidity, it will be easier for dust mites and mold spores to spread around. This can increase your chances of getting allergies, respiratory problems, or even asthma. So exercise alone isn't going to keep you stay healthy if this is going on. We strongly recommend the use of a dehumidifier to solve this. While your friend Sweat regulates body temperature, our friend Dehumidifier regulates humidity. That's why Sweat and Dehumidifier are such great friends!

    For other tips on how to lower down those humidity levels, you can read this post: 9 Ways to Fight Humidity And if you've seen black mold and mildew around, you may want to learn the 6 Steps to Winning the Battle Against Mold.

     

    Testimonial:

    People on yoga mats at yoga class at a yoga studio. Some in yoga pants.

    "Love it. I own a fitness studio with 2 workout rooms and the humidity was out of control (...) In fact, I bought another one so each room has one and they run nonstop(...) we empty them about 2-3 times a day and they definitely bring our humidity down about 20% on a consistent basis." Dana, TOSOT Dehumidifier customer.

    Click here if you want to begin experiencing the benefits of using a dehumidifier.

    Order yours now!

     

    Use information at your own risk:  The information presented is intended for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis or treatment. Never disregard professional medical or home improvement advice. The information and suggestions should be discussed with a professional.  You are responsible for independently verifying the information if you intend to rely upon or use it in any way. You use all information at your own risk. 


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